2016 Camden Conference (New)

Camden Conference > 2016 Camden Conference (New)

2016 CAMDEN CONFERENCE

The New Africa

February 19-21, 2016

The 29th annual Camden ConferenceThe New Africa, asserted that today’s Africa is radically different from the continent portrayed in most textbooks or even in much of the contemporary media. It’s home to the world’s poorest nations, yet a dozen of its economies maintained seven percent growth over the last decade. While Africa is a major global provider of mineral and other natural resources, Africans today are increasingly questioning the corrupt practices of the past and are now seeking the benefits of these resources. Africa’s population is ballooning, creating a youthful culture that can help sustain economic expansion and cultural adaptation, but it carries the threat of the kind of violence that has engulfed much of the similarly youthful Middle East. It is also prey to massive ecological degradation, alongside rich and creative cultures and vibrant civil societies.Perhaps the most striking aspect of Africa today, though, is the determination of Africans to frame their own future, breaking free of their colonial heritage to find African solutions. The New Africa considered what foreign and regional policies Africans are espousing for themselves and assessed what US policy has been and should be toward this massively diverse continent.

CC16_Image800
Conference Highlights (PDF)

Conference Highlights

Conference Video Archives

Snapshots from the Continent: Where Sub-Saharan Africa is Today…and Where it may be Heading

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton

West Africa Correspondent for NPR (National Public Radio) News, based in Dakar, Senegal

China Transformed?
Some Historical Perspectives
on Chinese Society

Michael Tsin

Associate Professor of History and International Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

China’s Economic Growth:
Implications and Challenges

Philip H. Brown

Assistant Professor of Economics, Colby College

China, Japan, and the Korean Peninsula,
Can it Work?

James R. Lilley

Former U.S. Ambassador to China and Korea, Former Director of The American Institute in Taiwan

China Transformed?
Some Historical Perspectives
on Chinese Society

Michael Tsin

Associate Professor of History and International Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

China’s Economic Growth:
Implications and Challenges

Philip H. Brown

Assistant Professor of Economics, Colby College

China, Japan, and the Korean Peninsula,
Can it Work?

James R. Lilley

Former U.S. Ambassador to China and Korea, Former Director of The American Institute in Taiwan

China Transformed?
Some Historical Perspectives
on Chinese Society

Michael Tsin

Associate Professor of History and International Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

China’s Economic Growth:
Implications and Challenges

Philip H. Brown

Assistant Professor of Economics, Colby College

China, Japan, and the Korean Peninsula,
Can it Work?

James R. Lilley

Former U.S. Ambassador to China and Korea, Former Director of The American Institute in Taiwan

China Transformed?
Some Historical Perspectives
on Chinese Society

Michael Tsin

Associate Professor of History and International Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

China’s Economic Growth:
Implications and Challenges

Philip H. Brown

Assistant Professor of Economics, Colby College

China, Japan, and the Korean Peninsula,
Can it Work?

James R. Lilley

Former U.S. Ambassador to China and Korea, Former Director of The American Institute in Taiwan

Conference Photo Gallery